Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

and most probably they will let things take their own course. Marriage 

is too important a matter to admit of being hastened. 

 

There are, I am aware, unwise parents, who, from various motives, will 

throw obstacles in the way of young people who are desirous of coming 

together. Some are so selfish as to be unwilling to part with their 

daughter, preferring their own happiness to hers. Others are so silly 

as to think no ordinary man good enough for her, and therefore, if 

they had their own way, would have her to become an old maid. 

Fortunately, such shortsighted people are not infrequently outwitted. 

 

If your parents are, as I hope they are, reasonable in their views and 

expectations, one of the chief concerns of their life will be the 

promotion of your happiness, and it behooves you to pay the utmost 

deference to their opinion; and should they, from circumstances they 

become aware of, deem it advisable that you should either postpone or 

even break off an engagement, they will doubtless give you such 

weighty reasons as will justify you in acting on their advice. Where, 

however, as sometimes happens, they unwisely refuse their consent to 

their child's marriage at a time when she well knows from her own 

feelings, and also from the sanction she receives from the opinion of 

trustworthy and judicious friends, that she would be making a real 

sacrifice were she to comply with their wishes; if, I say, under such 

circumstances she acts disobediently and marries the man she loves, 

more blame attaches to the parents than to herself, and the sooner 

they forgive her the better. 

 

It is very common for young men, when going into the company of young 

woman, together with their best dress to put on their best behavior; 

in fact, to assume a character which is not their natural one, but far 

superior to it. 

 

Some hold the opinion that 

 

 

"ALL IS FAIR IN LOVE AND WAR." 

 

To me it appears there cannot be greater folly and wickedness than for 

young people who are thinking of marrying to attempt to deceive each 

other. What is the good of it? A very short period of married life 

will entirely dispel the illusion. I suppose people of the world may 

think it fair to overreach one another in their dealings, saying 

"everyone for himself." They have no intention of seeking to promote 

the other's happiness; present gain is all they want. But a married 

pair, to be happy, must 

 

 

RESPECT AND ESTEEM, AS WELL AS LOVE, 

 

each other; and this cannot be attained except by the constant 

endeavor to _be_ as well as to _appear_ true and good. 

 

That young men should behave well in the presence of women is only 

natural and right; none but a fool would do otherwise. But you, long 

before thinking of marrying, should take all fair means to learn what 

is the general conduct and habits of your male acquaintance in their 


Page 3 from 7:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   Forward