Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER IV. 

 

LOVE AND MARRIAGE. 

 

 

The attraction of the sexes for each other, though based upon the dual 

principle of generation which pervades the living world and which has 

its analogies in the attractive forces of matter, yet pervades the 

whole being. 

 

 

LOVE IS NOT MERELY 

 

the instinctive desire of physical union, which has for its object the 

continuation of the species--it belongs to the mind as well as to the 

body. It warms, invigorates, and elevates every sentiment, every 

feeling; and in its highest, purest, most diffusive form unites us to 

God and all creatures in Him. 

 

 

ALL LOVE IS 

 

essentially the same, but modified according to its objects and by the 

character of the one who loves. The love of children for their 

parents, of parents for offspring, brotherly and sisterly love, the 

love of friendship, of charity, and the fervor of religious love, are 

modifications of the same sentiment--the attraction that draws us to 

our kindred, our kind; that binds together all races and humanity 

itself, resting on the fatherhood of God and the brotherhood of man. 

It is but natural that this love should vary in degrees. Attractions 

are proportional to proximity. Family is nearer than country; we 

prefer our own nation to the rest of the race. 

 

Each individual has, also, his own special attractions and repulsions. 

There is love at first sight and friendship at first sight. We feel 

some persons pleasant to us; to be near them is a delight. Generally 

such feelings are mutual--like flows to like, or as often, perhaps, 

differences fit into each other. We seek sympathy with our own tastes 

and habits, or we find in others what we lack. Thus the weak rest upon 

the strong, the timid are fond of the courageous, the reckless seek 

guidance of the prudent, and so on. The sentiment of 

 

 

LOVE FOR THE OPPOSITE SEX 

 

--tender, romantic, passionate--begins very early in life. Fathers and 

daughters, mothers and sons, have a special fondness for each other, 

as, also, have brothers and sisters; but the boy soon comes to admire 

someone, generally older than himself, who is not a relation. Very 

little girls find a hero in some friend of an elder brother. 

 

 

FONDNESS FOR COUSINS 

 

generally comes more from opportunity than natural attraction, though 

a cousin may have very little appearance of family relation. The law 

appears to be that free choice seeks the diverse and distant. A 

stranger has always a better chance with the young ladies of any 

district than the young men with whom they have always been 

acquainted. Savages seek their wives out of their own tribe. 

 

It is my belief that naturally (I mean in a state of pure and 

unperverted nature, but developed cultivated, and refined by 


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