Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

first prime of life, bachelors decay and grow old much faster than 

married men. 

 

The rich are qualified for marriage before the poor. This is owing to 

the superiority of their aliment; for very nutritious food, and the 

constant use of wines, coffee, etc., greatly assists in developing the 

organs of reproduction; whereas the food generally made use of among 

the peasantry of most countries--as vegetables, corn, milk, 

etc.--retards their growth. Owing to this difference of diet, the 

daughter of a man of wealth, who keeps a good table, will be as 

adequate to certain duties of married life at eighteen as the daughter 

of a humble peasant at twenty-one. Singular as it may seem, it is none 

the less true, that love novels, amorous conversations, playing parlor 

games for kisses, voluptuous pictures, waltzing, and, in fact, all 

things having a tendency to create desire, assist in promoting puberty 

and preparing young persons for early marriage. Those who reach this 

estate, however, by artificial means and much before the natural 

period will have to suffer for it in after life. 

 

The female who marries before the completion of her womanhood--that 

is, before her puberty is established--will cease to grow and probably 

become pale and delicate, the more especially if she become pregnant 

soon after marriage. A person who is thus circumstanced will also be 

liable to abortions and painful deliveries. 

 

 

MARRIAGE, UNLESS 

 

under very peculiar circumstances, should not take place until two or 

three years after the age of puberty. Many instances could be cited of 

the injurious effects resulting from not observing this rule. The case 

of the son of Napoleon I. is a notable instance, who, at the age of 

fifteen or sixteen, began his career of sexual indulgence, which ended 

his life at the early age of twenty-one years. He was an amiable, 

inoffensive, and studious youth, beloved by his grandfather and the 

whole Austrian court; and though the son of the most energetic man 

that modern times has produced, yet, from his effeminate life, he 

scarcely attracted the least public attention. 

 

Let me, therefore, advise the male reader to keep his desires in 

leading-strings until he is at least twenty-one, and the female not to 

enter the pale of wedlock until she is past her eighteenth year; but 

after these periods marriage is their proper sphere of action, and one 

in which they must play a part or suffer actual pain as well as the 

loss of one of the greatest of earthly pleasures. 

 

 

MARRIAGES ARE MOST HAPPY 

 

and most productive of handsome and healthy offspring when the husband 

and wife differ, not only in mental conformation, but in bodily 

construction. A melancholy man should mate himself with a sprightly 

woman, and _vice versa_; for otherwise they will soon grow weary of 


Page 2 from 5:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   Forward