Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

deteriorates. Health is therefore one of the conditions of progress. 

 

"It is all very fine," I shall be told, "to talk of purity and 

chastity; but we must take men as they are. How are you going to make 

men pure and chaste, and respectful of the purity of women? How can 

you get men with strong amative propensities to live like anchorites?" 

 

How can you get men to do anything right, or refrain from any wrong 

thing? There are three motives--fear of punishment, hope of reward, 

and sense of right or the principle of duty. The first of these is the 

lowest, but often the most effectual; the second is higher, and 

appeals to hope and the love of happiness; the third, the highest of 

all motives, pure and unselfish as the love of truth, as in 

mathematics, acts on noble minds with great power. Men of real 

conscientiousness love the right for its own sake. They are just from 

love of justice; pure from a sense and love of purity. They love good, 

and God as the source of all good; and do right, not from fear or 

hope, but from pure love. 

 

We must appeal to all motives. Men refrain from theft and other 

dishonest conduct from the dread of disgrace and punishment, because 

they see that "honesty is the best policy," and from a sense of 

justice and regard to the rights of property, or a sense of honor 

which makes a mean action impossible. By similar motives great numbers 

are restrained from drunkenness and other vices. Children are to be 

restrained from impurity by the fear of the terrible consequences of 

unnatural indulgence in causing disease and pain, by the hope of a 

pure, healthy and happy life of love in manhood and womanhood, and by 

a sense of the beauty and holiness of chastity and the sacredness of 

the functions by which the race is recreated and preserved. The 

religious feelings that our bodies are to be kept pure, healthy, and 

holy in every way as the temples of the Holy Ghost cannot be too early 

instilled into the infant mind, which is open to the highest 

sentiments of veneration, devotion, and heroic religion. In youth 

there are the same motives. Indulgence in solitary vice is 

self-destructive of all that youth most values--a profanation of his 

own body. 

 

 

SEDUCTION 

 

is a desecration of what he should hold in the most tender reverence. 

To the young man, womanhood should be sacred, and every woman, mother, 

sister, beloved of the present or the future, should never be wronged 

by one thought of impurity. In this matter instinct goes with right. 

The inward voice supports the outer law of morality. Before men can 

become bad, their instinctive modesty must be broken down. Unless very 

badly born, with disordered amativeness, hereditary from a diseased 

and lustful parentage, they must be perverted and corrupted before 

they can act immodestly and impurely. 


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