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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

wrong to the female and in total opposition to the ordinance of 

nature. Wherever polygamy is the custom the female is held in slavish 

subjection. It only prospers in proportion to the ignorance of the 

sex. Intelligent and civilized woman will always rebel against such 

debasement and servitude. 

 

 

MARRIAGE CUSTOMS. 

 

It would probably be interesting to many to describe the marriage 

ceremonies observed by different nations, but to enter into a 

descriptive detail would occupy too much space. It is sufficient to 

say that while some wives are wooed and won, others are bought and 

sold; while in some countries the husband brings the wife to his home, 

in others, as in Formosa, the daughter brings her husband to her 

father's house, and he is considered one of the family, while the 

sons, upon marriage, leave the family forever. In civilized countries, 

the ceremonies are either ministerial or magisterial, and are more or 

less religious in character; while in others, less civilized, the 

gaining of a wife depends upon a foot-race, in which the female has 

the start of one-third the distance of the course, as is the custom 

in Lapland. In Caffraria, the lover must first fight himself into the 

affections of his ladylove, and if he defeats all his rivals she 

becomes his wife without further ceremony. Among the Congo tribes, a 

wife is taken upon trial for a year, and if not suited to the standard 

of taste of the husband, he returns her to her patents. In Persia, the 

wife's status depends upon her fruitfulness; if she be barren, she can 

be put aside. In the same country they have also permanent marriages 

and marriages for a certain period only--the latter never allowed to 

exceed ninety years. 

 

In fact, the marriage ceremonies differ in nearly all countries. To us 

some may appear very absurd, and yet our customs may be just as 

amazing to them. It matters but little how a conjugal union is 

effected so long as sanctioned by law or custom and it obligates the 

parties, by common opinion, to observe the duties pertaining to 

married life. 

 

 

THE BASIS OF A HAPPY MARRIAGE. 

 

The state of conjugal union should be the happiest in the whole of the 

existence of either man or woman, and is such in a congenial marriage. 

Yet in the history of very many marriages contentment or happiness is 

palpably absent and an almost insufferable misery is the heritage of 

both parties. It is therefore important that previous to the marital 

union the parties should take everything into consideration that 

fore-shadows happiness after marriage, as well as everything 

calculated to despoil conjugal felicity. 

 

The first requisite of congenial marriage is love. Without being 

cemented by this element the conjugal union is sure to be uncongenial. 

It is the strongest bond, the firmest cord, uniting two hearts 


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