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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XIII. 

 

HOME DECORATION. 

 

 

The chief features to be observed in house furnishing are color, form, 

and proportion. All stiffness of design in furniture should be 

avoided. Do not attempt to match articles, but rather carry out the 

same idea as to color and form in the whole. It is not _en regle_ to 

have decorations in sets or pairs; the arrangements should all be done 

with odd pieces. Every room in the house should be arranged for 

occupancy, having nothing too good for use, and the judicious 

housewife will follow a medium course and adopt no extreme of fashion. 

 

The style and arrangement of the furniture should correspond with the 

size of the room, with a due regard to the place a piece of furniture 

or ornament will occupy. The order of arrangement in furnishing is 

subject to individual taste, but the following suggestions may not be 

inappropriate:-- 

 

In decorating a dining-room, deep, rich tones should be used; a 

drawingroom or parlor should have bright, cheerful shades; in a 

library use deep, rich colors, which give a sense of worth; a 

sleeping-room should have light, pleasing tints, which give a feeling 

of repose. 

 

 

THE HALL. 

 

The hall being the index to the whole house, due care should therefore 

be given to its furnishing. Light colors and gilding should be 

avoided. The wall and ceiling decorations now mostly used are in dark, 

rich colors, shaded in maroons or deep reds. Plain tinted walls and 

ceilings in fresco or wainscot are also frequently used. The latest 

shades of wall paper come in wood colors, dark olive-greens, stone 

color, and grays, in tile, arabesque and landscape designs, and with 

these are used a corresponding dado and frieze. 

 

A tile or inlaid floor is the most appropriate, but if circumstances 

do not admit of one of these, a floor stained a deep wood-brown, base 

board and moldings to correspond, may be substituted; when India 

mattings and rugs may be used. 

 

The colors now in vogue for hall carpets are crimson or Pompeiian 

reds, with small figures of moss-green or peacock-blue. The prevailing 

shades of the walls and floor should be incorporated in the stair 

carpet. 

 

If the hall is narrow, none but the most essential pieces of furniture 

should be used; but if wide enough, there may be a lounge placed 

against one of the walls, an old-fashioned clock of the cuckoo style 

set in a quiet corner, two high-backed chairs upholstered in leather, 

a table, an umbrella-stand placed near the door, a jardiniere filled 

with tropical plants set near the foot of the stairway, and a hall 

mirror with a deer's head and antlers placed above it and a wooden or 

marble slab underneath. The slab should be covered with a Roman scarf, 

allowing a fall of twelve inches at each end. The hatrack must also 

find a place. Family portraits or a few well-selected pictures are 


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