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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

a window or wall. The mantel mirror, with its beveled edges and small 

racks arranged on each side, looks very effective when decorated with 

pretty oddities--ferns, grasses, and pieces of old china. A jardiniere 

filled with living plants and placed near a bay window makes an 

elegant ornament. Care should be taken in arranging that the room be 

not over-crowded. There should be a few good pictures or painted 

plaques mounted in plush hung on the walls; a portrait may be placed 

on a common easel and draped with a scarf in old gold or peacock-blue, 

and tiny lambrequins, painted or embroidered, may hang beneath a 

bracket supporting a bust or flower-vase. 

 

An embroidered scarf with fringed ends may be placed on the back of a 

chair or sofa in place of the old lace tidy. A sack made of small 

pieces of bright-colored plush or silk in crazy work may be flung 

across the table, the ends drooping very low. The mantelpiece may be 

covered with a corresponding sash, over which place a small clock as 

centerpiece and arrange ornaments on each side--statuettes, bannerets, 

flower-holders, small Japanese fans, pieces of odd china, painted 

candles in small scenes, may all find a place on the mantel. 

 

Window curtains of heavy fabric, hung from brass or plush mounted 

poles, may be gracefully draped to the sides, while the inner lace 

ones should be hung straight and be fastened in the center with some 

ornament or bow of ribbon corresponding in shade to the general tone 

of the room. The straight shades next to the glass may correspond in 

tone to the outside walls or window-facings; but this is a mere matter 

of taste. White or light-tinted shades, finished in etching or narrow 

lace, are always in vogue. 

 

The dado shades are the latest innovation in window decoration. These 

come in all colors, from the lightest to the darkest shades, with dado 

in tile, arabesque and fresco patterns, finished in lace, fringe, and 

brasses. 

 

Portieres (curtain doors) have superseded folding doors. These should 

be in shades to contrast with the general blending of the colors in 

the room. The fabrics mostly used are India goods, but they may be of 

any material, from expensive tapestries, satins, and plushes, to 

ten-cent factory cottons. The curtains, if made from striped tapestry 

and Turcoman, will give the finishing artistic touches to almost any 

room, but the last softening polish comes only from the genial 

presence of trailing and climbing vines. 

 

 

THE SITTING-ROOM. 

 

The sitting or everyday room should be the brightest and most 

attractive room in the house. Its beauty of decoration should not be 

so much in the richness and variety of material as in its comfort, 

simplicity, and the harmony of its tints--the main features being the 

fitness of each article to the needs of the room. In these days of so 


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