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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

rooted in a week. Do not water too freely or the slip will rot. 

 

If house plants are watered once a week with water in which is mixed a 

few drops of ammonia they will thrive much better. Sometimes small 

white worms are found in the earth--lime water will kill them. Stir up 

the soil before pouring it on, to expose as many as possible. For 

running vines, burn beef bones and mix with the earth. 

 

 

TO KEEP PLANTS WITHOUT A FIRE AT NIGHT. 

 

Have made, of wood or zinc, a tray about four inches deep with a 

handle on either end, water-tight. Paint it outside and in, put in 

each corner a post as high as the tallest of your plants, and it is 

ready for use. Arrange your flowerpots in it and fill between them 

with sawdust. This absorbs the moisture falling from the plants when 

you water them and retains the warmth acquired during the day, keeping 

the temperature of the roots even. When you retire at night spread 

over the posts a blanket or shawl, and there is no danger of freezing. 

 

 

SURE SHOT FOR ROSE-SLUGS. 

 

Make a tea of tobacco stems and a soapsuds of whale oil or carbolic 

soap; mix and apply to the bush with a sprinkler, turning the bush so 

as to wet the under as well as the upper part of the leaves. Apply, 

before the sun is up, three or four times. 

 

 

TO PREPARE AUTUMN LEAVES AND FERNS. 

 

Immediately after gathering take a moderately warm iron, smear it well 

with white wax, rub over each surface of the leaf once, applying more 

wax for each leaf. This process causes leaves to roll about as when 

hanging on the trees. If pressed more they become brittle and remain 

perfectly flat. Maple and oak are among the most desirable, and may be 

gathered any time after the severe frosts; but the sumac and ivy must 

be secured as soon after the first slight frost as they become tinted 

or the leaflets will fall from the stem. Ferns may be selected any 

time during the season. A large book must be used in gathering them, 

as they will be spoiled for pressing if carried in the hand. A weight 

should be placed on them until they are perfectly dry; then, excepting 

the most delicate ones, it will be well to press them like the leaves, 

as they are liable to curl when placed in a warm atmosphere. These 

will form beautiful combinations with the sumac and ivy. 

 

 

TO PREPARE SKELETON LEAVES. 

 

When properly prepared, skeleton leaves form a companion to the 

scrapbook or collection of pressed ferns, fronds, etc. This is a 

tedious operation and requires skill and great patience to obtain 

satisfactory results. Some leaves are easier to dissect and make 

better specimens than others, and, as a rule, a hard, thin leaf should 

be chosen; that is, when a special variety is not required. 

 

Among those which are skeletonized most successfully are the English 


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