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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

ivy, box elder, willow, grape, pear, rose, etc. They should be 

gathered during the month of June, or as soon as the leaf is fully 

developed. The leaves should be immersed in a vessel of rain water and 

allowed to remain till decomposed. When this takes place, press the 

leaf between pieces of soft flannel, and the film will adhere to the 

flannel, leaving a perfect network. Dry off gradually and clean the 

specimen with a soft hair pencil. Place between folds of soft blotting 

paper, and when perfectly dry place in your collection. 

 

 

TO BLEACH THE LEAVES, 

 

dissolve one half pound of chloride of lime in three pints of rain 

water, strain, and use one part of the solution to one of water. For 

ferns, use the solution full strength. When perfectly white remove to 

clear water, let stand for several hours, changing water two or three 

times, float out on paper, and press between blotting paper in books. 

 

In mounting use mucilage made of five parts gum arabic, three parts 

white sugar, two parts starch, and very little water; boil and stir 

till thick and white. 

 

 

HANGING BASKETS. 

 

A correspondent of the _Gardener's Monthly_ tells of a new style of 

hanging basket made of round maple sticks about one inch in diameter, 

eight inches in length at the bottom, increasing to fourteen at the 

top. In constructing, begin at the bottom and build up, log-cabin 

fashion; chink the openings with green moss and line the whole basket 

with the same. These are easily kept moist, and the plants droop and 

twine over them very gracefully. A good way to keep the earth moist in 

a hanging basket without the trouble of taking it down is to fill a 

bottle with water and put in two pieces of yarn, leaving one end 

outside. Suspend the bottle just above the basket and allow the water 

to drip. This will keep the earth moist enough for winter and save a 

great deal of time and labor. Plant morning glory seeds in hanging 

baskets in winter; they grow rapidly and are very pretty.--_Buckeye._ 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XV. 

 

THE LAUNDRY. 

 

TELLING OF A GREAT MANY USEFUL AND LABOR-SAVING 

PRACTICES FOR THE LAUNDRY. 

 

 

TO MAKE WASHING FLUID. 

 

Bring to a boil one pound of sal soda, half a pound of unslaked lime, 

a small lump of borax, and five quarts of water. Let cool, pour off, 

and bottle. Use one teacupful to a boiler of clothes. This is 

superior. 

 

 

GALL SOAP. 

 

For washing woolens, silks, or fine prints liable to fade. One pint 

beefs gall, two pounds common bar soap cut fine, one quart boiling 

soft water; boil slowly, stirring occasionally until well mixed. Pour 

into a flat vessel, and when cold cut into pieces to dry. 


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