Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

iron, lay on a table, and brush it with a soft brush or cloth. 

 

 

TO CLEAN RIBBONS. 

 

Dissolve white soap in boiling water; when cool enough to bear the 

hand, pass the ribbons through it, rubbing gently, so as not to injure 

the texture; rinse through lukewarm water and pin on a board to dry. 

If the colors are bright yellow, maroon, crimson or scarlet, add a few 

drops of oil of vitriol to the rinse water; if the color is bright 

scarlet, add to the rinse water a few drops of muriate of tin. 

 

 

TO TAKE OUT PAINT. 

 

Equal parts of ammonia and spirits of turpentine will take paint out 

of clothing. Saturate the spot two or three times, and then wash out 

in soapsuds. 

 

 

TO REMOVE INK STAIN. 

 

Immediately saturate with milk, soak it up with a rag, apply more, rub 

well, and in a few minutes the ink will disappear. 

 

 

TO TAKE GREASE OUT 

 

of silk, woolens, paper, floors, etc., grate chalk thick over the 

spot, cover with brown paper, set on it a hot flatiron and let it 

remain until cool; repeat if necessary. The iron must not be so hot as 

to burn paper or cloth. 

 

 

FRUIT STAINS. 

 

Colored cottons or woolens stained with wine or fruit should be wet in 

alcohol and ammonia, then sponged off gently (not rubbed) with 

alcohol; after that, if the material will warrant it, washed in tepid 

soapsuds. Silk may be wet with this preparation when injured by these 

stains. 

 

 

TO REMOVE IRON RUST. 

 

While rinsing clothes, take such as have spots of iron, wring out, dip 

a wet finger in oxalic acid and rub on the spot, then dip in salt and 

rub on and hold on a warm flatiron, and the spot will immediately 

disappear; rinse again, rubbing the place a little with the hands. 

 

 

TO TAKE OUT MILDEW. 

 

Wet the cloth and rub on soap and chalk, mixed together, and lay in 

the sun; or, lay the cloth in buttermilk for a short time, take out 

and place in the hot sun; or, put lemon juice on and treat in the same 

way. 

 

 

TO WASH WOOLEN GOODS. 

 

Many woolen goods, such as light-colored, heavy sacques, nubias, etc., 

may be washed in cold suds and rinsed in cold water. The garments 

should be well shaken out and pulled into shape. 

 

 

TO WASH FLANNELS IN TEPID WATER. 

 

The usefulness of liquid ammonia is not as universally known among 

housewives as it deserves to be. If you add some of it to a soapsuds 

made of a mild soap it will prevent the flannel from becoming yellow 

or shrinking. It is the potash and soda combined in sharp soap which 

tend to color animal fibers yellow; the shrinking may be partially due 

to this agency, but above all to the exposure of the flannel while wet 


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