Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XVI. 

 

HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. 

 

 

In the following chapter are given full instructions for dry and wet 

stamping, explaining how to make stamping powder, how to mix white 

paint for stamping dark goods and black paint for stamping light 

goods. 

 

The articles necessary are a sheet of writing paper and a piece of 

transfer paper. The transfer paper can be made by rubbing white paper 

with a composition consisting of two ounces of tallow, one-half ounce 

powdered blacklead, one-quarter pint linseed oil, and sufficient 

lampblack to make it of the consistency of cream. These should be 

melted together and rubbed on the paper while hot. When dry it will be 

fit for use. 

 

In order to make a perforated pattern of any engraving, procure a 

piece of writing paper larger than the design to be traced and put a 

piece of transfer paper on the writing paper, then place both sheets 

directly under the engraving and pin the three sheets together at one 

end, having the transfer paper between and dark side facing the 

writing paper. You then take a quill with a fine point (a knitting 

needle will do nicely) and without leaning too hard go over all the 

outline of the engraving. You must be careful not to press your 

fingers on the engraving, as this would cause a deposit of powder the 

same color as the transferring paper on the writing paper. Now remove 

the transfer paper and you have the design accurately traced and the 

pattern is ready to be perforated. Lay a couple of folds of velvet or 

felt on the table, place the pattern on this, and with a needle of 

medium size or tracing-wheel prick out the pattern, being careful to 

follow the outline closely and make the perforations quite close. 

 

 

MECHANICAL ENLARGEMENT OF DESIGNS. 

 

The simplest way is to enlarge by the eye, as the artists do. One 

method is to divide the whole design into squares and rule off the 

paper to be enlarged in corresponding squares of larger size. Each 

portion within the square is then exactly reproduced, copying the 

portion in the smaller square. For embroidery designs especially we 

should think this would be very good. 

 

 

DRY STAMPING. 

 

This is done by a process known as pouncing. The process is as 

follows: Place the pattern (rough side up) on the material to be 

stamped, placing heavy weights on the corner to keep it from slipping; 

then rub the powder over the perforations with the pouncet or 

distributor described below till the pattern is clearly marked on the 

material. This can be ascertained by lifting one corner of the pattern 

slightly. Then remove the pattern carefully, lay a piece of thin paper 

over the stamping and pass a hot iron over it. This melts the gum in 

the powder and fastens the pattern to the material. The iron should be 


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