Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

to be decorated, and with the roller press it well down. With the 

brush wet the back of the paper covering the design, when the paper 

may be at once lifted off. Another method is to cut out the design 

carefully and cover it with a thin coating of mastic varnish, and lay 

it upon the silk or other fabric (which should be dampened) and roll 

thoroughly with a rubber roller; dampen the back of the paper with the 

brush and lift it off as previously directed. 

 

 

TO MAKE WAX FLOWERS. 

 

The following articles will be required to commence waxwork: Two 

pounds white wax, one quarter pound hair wire, one bottle carmine, one 

bottle ultramarine blue, one bottle chrome yellow, two bottles chrome 

green No. 1, one bottle each of rose pink, royal purple, scarlet 

powder, and balsam fir; two dozen sheets white wax. This will do to 

begin with. Now have a clean tin dish, and pour therein a quart or two 

of water; then put in about one pound of the white wax and let it 

boil. When cool enough so the bubbles will not form on top it is ready 

to sheet, which is done as follows: Take half of a window pane, 7 x 9, 

and, after having washed it clean, dip into a dish containing weak 

soapsuds; then dip into the wax, and draw it out steadily and plunge 

it into the suds, when the sheet will readily come off. Lay it on a 

cloth or clean paper to dry. Proceed in like manner until you have 

enough of the white; then add enough of the green powder to make a 

bright color, and heat and stir thoroughly until the color is evenly 

distributed, then proceed as for sheeting white wax. The other colors 

are rubbed into the leaves after they are cut out, rubbing light or 

heavy according to shade. 

 

For patterns you can use any natural leaf, forming the creases in wax 

with the thumb nail or a needle. To put the flowers together, or the 

leaves on to the stem, hold in the hand until warm enough to stick. If 

the sheeted wax is to be used in summer, put in a little balsam of fir 

to make it hard. If for winter, none will be required. 

 

You can make many flowers without a teacher, but one to assist in the 

commencement would be a great help, though the most particular thing 

about it is to get the wax sheeted. The materials I have suggested can 

be procured at any drug store, and will cost from .00 to .50. 

 

 

 


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