Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

 

Take zinc white, mix it with boiled oil to about the thickness of 

cream, add a little drying, such as painters use. Keep in a tin pail 

(one holding about a pint is a good size); have a piece of board cut 

round, with a screw in the center for a handle, to fit _loosely_ into 

the pail; drop this on the paint and it will keep it from drying up. 

Add a little oil occasionally to keep the paint from growing too 

thick, and it will always be ready for use. 

 

 

THE BRUSH. 

 

Take a fine stencil brush (or any brush with a square end), wind it 

tightly with a string from the handle down to within one half inch of 

the end; this will make it just stiff enough to distribute the paint 

well. Keep the brush in water, to keep it from drying up, taking care 

to wipe off the water before using. 

 

 

THE CARE OF PATTERNS. 

 

New patterns, before being used, should be rubbed over on the rough 

side with a smooth piece of pumice stone; this wears off the burr and 

makes the stamping come out cleaner and finer. When patterns are so 

large that they have to be folded, iron out the creases before using 

them. After using the patterns for powder stamping, snap the pattern 

to shake the powder from the perforations. After using the patterns 

for paint stamping they should be washed thoroughly with naphtha until 

the perforations are all perfectly clear. Keep the naphtha away from 

the fire. After the pattern has been washed, do not use it for powder 

until it has had time to thoroughly dry, otherwise it will gum up the 

holes and spoil the pattern. 

 

If these directions are carefully followed the stamping will always be 

satisfactory.--_Popular Art Instructor._ 

 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER XVII. 

 

BRONZE WORK. 

 

 

Bronzing is the latest improvement in waxwork, and if properly made 

cannot be detected from the most expensive artistic bronze. It answers 

for table, mantel, and bracket ornaments, and may be exposed to dust 

and air without sustaining the slightest injury. It can be dusted with 

a feather duster like any piece of furniture, and is a very desirable 

and inexpensive ornament. 

 

The colors required in bronze are: Silver bronze, gold bronze, copper 

bronze, fire bronze, and green bronze. 

 

 

THE ART OF MAKING A VASE IN BRONZE. 

 

For instruction, let us take a vase to be finished in copper bronze. 

First the vase must be molded. The casting material is one part wax, 

one part spermaceti, two parts mutton tallow. Melt the three articles 

together and color with burnt umber. Have a coil of fine hair wire, 

cut into one-half inch lengths, and when the mixture is melted to the 

consistency of thick cream stir in the cut wire by degrees until there 

is a sprinkling of it throughout the mixture; then pour into the 


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