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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

occupy them. So in the vegetable world--the bright and endlessly 

varied hues of flowers, and their sweet perfumes--even their very 

production--depend on sunlight. In obscure light plants grow lanky and 

become pale and feeble. They seldom produce flowers, and uniformly 

fail to ripen their seeds. In even partial darkness the green hue of 

their foliage gradually pales and disappears, and new growths, when 

they appear, are blanched or colorless. 

 

The best method of keeping the skin clean and healthy, by ablution and 

baths, may here be alluded to. The use of these, and the washing of 

the skin that forms part of the daily duties of the toilet, appear to 

be very simple matters, but writers on the subject differ in opinion 

as to the methods to be followed to render them perfect cleansers of 

the skin. Some of them regard the use of soap and water applied in the 

form of lather with the hands, and afterwards thoroughly removed from 

the skin by copious affusions, rinsing or sluicing with water, or 

immersion in it, as the best method. This is probably the case when 

the skin is not materially dirty, or its pores or surface obstructed 

or loaded with the residual solid matter of the perspiration or its 

own unctuous exudation and exuviae. To remove these completely and 

readily, something more than simple friction with the smooth hand is 

generally required. In such cases the use of a piece of flannel or 

serge, doubled and spread across the hand, or of a mitten of the same 

material, will be most ready and effective. Friction with this--first 

with soap, and afterwards with water to wash the soap off--will be 

found to cleanse the skin more thoroughly and quickly than any other 

method, and, by removing the worn-out portion of its surface, to 

impart to it a healthy glow and hue that is most refreshing and 

agreeable. This effect will be increased by wiping and rubbing the 

surface thoroughly dry with a coarse and moderately rough, but not a 

stiff, towel, instead of with the fine, smooth diapers which are now 

so commonly employed. At the bath, the fleshbrush usually provided 

there will supersede the necessity of using the flannel. 

 

The small black spots and marks frequently observed on the skin in hot 

weather, particularly on the face, generally arise from the 

accumulation of the indurated solid matter of the perspiration in its 

pores. When they assume the form of small pimples (_acne punctata_), 

and often when otherwise, they may be removed by strong pressure 

between the fingers, or between the nails of the opposite fingers, 

followed by the use of hot, soapy water. 

 

The subsequent daily application of a weak solution of bichloride of 

mercury--as in the form commonly known as Gowland's lotion--or of 

sulphate of zinc, will completely remove the swelling, and generally 

prevent their re-formation. 


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