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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

spots, resembling stains, common on the face and the backs of the 

hands of persons with a fair and delicate skin who are much exposed to 

the direct rays of the sun in hot weather, are of little importance in 

themselves, and have nothing to do with the general health. Ladies who 

desire to remove them may have recourse to the frequent application of 

dilute spirit, or lemon juice, or a lotion formed by adding acetic, 

hydrochloric, nitric, or sulphuric acid, or liquor of potassa, to 

water, until it is just strong enough to slightly prick the tongue. 

One part of good Jamaica rum to two parts of lemon juice or weak 

vinegar is a good form of lotion for the purpose. The effect of all 

these lotions is increased by the addition of a little glycerine. 

 

The preceding are also occasionally called "common freckles," "summer 

freckles," and "sun freckles." In some cases they are very persistent, 

and resist all attempts to remove them while the exposure that 

produces them is continued. Their appearance may be prevented by the 

greater use of the veil, parasol or sunshade, or avoidance of exposure 

to the sun during the heat of the day. 

 

Another variety, popularly known as cold freckles, occur at all 

seasons of the year, and usually depend on disordered health or some 

disturbance of the natural functions of the skin. Here the only 

external application that proves useful is the solution of bichloride 

of mercury and glycerine, or Gowland's lotion. 

 

=The Itch=--"psora" and "scabies," of medical authors; the "gale" of the 

French,--already referred to, in its common forms is an eruption of 

minute vesicles, generally containing animalcula (acari), and of which 

the principal seats are between the fingers, bend of the wrist, etc. 

It is, accompanied by intense itching of the parts affected, which is 

only aggravated by scratching. The usual treatment is with sulphur 

ointment (simple or compound) well rubbed in once or twice a day; a 

spoonful (more or less) of flowers of sulphur, mixed with treacle or 

milk, being taken at the same time, night and morning. Where the 

external use of sulphur is objectionable, on account of its smell, a 

sulphuretten bath or lotion, or one of chloride of lime, may be used 

instead. In all cases extreme cleanliness, with the free use of soap 

and water, must be strictly adhered to. 

 

The small, soft discolorations and excrescences of the skin, popularly 

called moles, may be removed by touching them every second or third 

day with strong acetic or nitric acid, or with lunar caustic. If 

covered with hair they should be shaved first. 

 

=Extreme paleness= of the skin, when not symptomatic of any primary 

disease, generally arises from debility, or from the languid 

circulation of the blood at the surface of the body; often, also, from 

insufficient or improper food, want of outdoor exercise, and the like. 


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