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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

The main treatment is evident. Warm baths, friction, and stimulating 

lotions and cosmetics may be here employed, together with a course of 

some mild chalbeate (as the lactate, protophosphate, or 

ammonia-citrate of iron) and hypophosphate of soda. 

 

=Roughness and Coarseness= of the skin, when not depending on any 

particular disease, may be removed or greatly lessened by daily 

friction with mild unguents or oil, or by moistening the parts, night 

and morning, with a weak solution of bichloride of mercury containing 

a little glycerine. 

 

=Rashes and redness= of the skin, of a common character, often arise 

from very trifling causes, among which indigestion, suppressed 

perspiration, irritation, and the like, are the most frequent. Nettle 

rash or urticaria, so called from the appearance and tingling 

sensations resembling those caused by the sting of nettles, in some 

people, is very apt to follow the use of indigestible and unwholesome 

food. It is usually of short duration and recurrent. The treatment 

consists in the administration of mild saline aperients, and, in 

severe cases, of an emetic, particularly when the stomach is still 

loaded with indigestible matter. These should be followed by copious 

use of lemonade made from the fresh expressed juice. The patient 

should be lightly but warmly clothed during the attack, and exposure 

to the cold, or to draughts of cold air, should be carefully avoided. 

The further treatment may be similar to that noticed under 

"eruptions." To prevent the recurrence of the attack, the 

objectionable articles of food, and any other known exciting causes, 

must be avoided. Red rash, red blotch, or fiery spot, a common 

consequence of disordered health, a sudden fit of dyspepsia, and, in 

females, of tight lacing, and rose rash, false measles, or roseola, 

having commonly a similar origin to the preceding, for the most part 

require the same treatment. 

 

=Scurf=--"furfur or furfura"--is a formation depending on the natural 

and healthy exfoliation of the skin on every part of the body on which 

hair or down grows, but most extensive and observable on the scalp, on 

account of the abundance and darker color of the hair there. 

Scurfiness, or excessive scurfiness, is the result of morbid action, 

and may be treated by the frequent use of the fleshbrush or hairbrush, 

ablution with soap and water, and the use of mild stimulating, 

astringent, or detergent lotions. 

 

=Scurvy=--"scorbutus" of medical writers--is a disease which, even in 

its incipient and early stages, when its presence is often 

unsuspected, is most injurious to the skin and complexion. It usually 

commences with unnatural sallowness, debility, and low spirits. As it 

proceeds, the gums become sore, spongy, and apt to bleed on the 

slightest pressure or friction; the teeth loosen, and the breath 


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