Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

 

 

 

THE CARE OF THE TEETH. 

 

The influence which the teeth are capable of exercising on the 

personal appearance is usually known and admitted. 

 

The teeth have formed especial objects of attention, in connection 

with the toilet and cosmetic arts, from almost the earliest ages of 

the world to the present time. History and tradition, and the 

researches of archaeologists among the remains of the prehistoric 

nations of the East, show us that even dentistry may trace back its 

origin to a date not very long subsequent to the "confusion of 

tongues." 

 

We are told that the ancient Welsh took particular care of their 

teeth, by frequently rubbing them with a stick of green hazel and a 

woollen cloth. To prevent their premature decay, they scrupulously 

avoided acid liquids, and invariably abstained from all hot food and 

drink. 

 

Europeans pride themselves on teeth of pearly whiteness; but many 

Asiatic nations regard them as beautiful only when of a black color. 

The Chinese, in order to blacken them, chew what is called "betel" or 

"betel nut," a common masticatory in the East. The Siamese and the 

Tonquinese do the same, but to a still greater extent, which renders 

their teeth as black as ebony, or more so. As the use of the 

masticatory is generally not commenced until a certain age, the common 

practice is to stain the teeth of the boys and girls with a strong 

preparation of it, on the former attaining the age of ten or twelve. 

 

Keeping the lips apart and breathing through the mouth instead of the 

nose, and, particularly, sleeping with the mouth open, are habits 

which are very prejudicial to the teeth and gums. In this way the 

mouth forms a trap to catch the dust and gritty particles floating in 

the atmosphere, which soon mechanically injure the enamel of the teeth 

by attrition. 

 

On the subject of cleanliness in connection with the teeth and mouth, 

it may be said that the mouth cannot be too frequently rinsed during 

the day, and that it should be more particularly so treated after each 

meal. Pure cold water is the best for the purpose. It not only cleans 

the teeth and mouth, but exerts a tonic action on the gums, which warm 

water, or even tepid water, is deficient in. When cold water cannot be 

tolerated, tepid water may be employed, the temperature being slightly 

lowered once every week or ten days until cold water can be borne. 

Every one who abhors a foetid breath, rotten teeth, and the 

toothache, would do well to thoroughly clean his teeth at bedtime, 

observing to well rinse the mouth with cold water on rising in the 

morning, and again in the day once, or oftener, as the opportunities 

occur. With smokers, the use of the toothbrush the last thing at night 

is almost obligatory if they value their teeth and wish to avoid the 

unpleasant flavor and sensation which teeth fouled with tobacco smoke 


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