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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

than clean and delicate hands are of refinement and gentility. To 

promote softness and whiteness of the skin, mild emollient soaps, or 

those abounding in oil or fat, should alone be adopted for common use; 

by which means the tendency to contract chaps and chilblains, and 

roughness from drying winds, will also be lessened. The coarse, strong 

kinds of soap, those abounding in alkali, should be rejected, as they 

tend to render the skin rough, dry and brittle. Rain, or soft, water 

is the best natural water for washing the hands, as it cleanses them 

more rapidly and completely than ordinary hard water, and with the use 

of less soap. It may be advantageously used tepid, or even warm; but 

hot water should be avoided. Distilled water, when obtainable, is 

preferable to even rain water. In the absence of these, water that 

has been boiled and allowed to settle and cool may be employed. With 

hard water the hands are cleansed with difficulty, and though it may 

be readily softened by the addition of a little soda, such an addition 

tends to make the skin of a delicate hand somewhat hard and rough. If 

hard water must be used to wash with, the only harmless substance that 

can be conveniently added to it is a little good powdered borax. This 

will also cause it to exert a genial action on the skin. Oatmeal and 

warm water used every night and morning as a wash will whiten and 

soften the roughest and darkest hands. 

 

=Coarse, Red, Dark-Skinned Hands= may be whitened by the occasional use 

of a few grains of chloride of lime, with warm water, in the manner 

mentioned above. 

 

=Roughness of the Hands=, induced by exposure to cold and drying winds, 

may, in general, be removed by the use of a little powdered pumice 

stone with the soap in washing them. The subsequent application, 

particularly at night, of the above lotions, or of two or three drops 

of almond or olive oil, well rubbed in, will usually effect the object 

completely. 

 

The hands may be preserved dry for delicate work by rubbing a little 

club moss (lycopodium), in fine powder, over them. So repellent is 

this substance of moisture, that if a small quantity of it be 

sprinkled on the surface of a basin of water, the hand, by a little 

adroitness, may be plunged to the bottom of the basin without becoming 

wet. 

 

Excessive moisture or perspiration of the hands without obvious cause 

is generally indicative of debility, or disordered stomach, and 

requires corresponding treatment. Frequently washing the hands in 

moderately cold water often proves a local remedy for the 

inconvenience. The addition of a few grains of alum, sal ammoniac, or 

sulphate of zinc, or of a teaspoonful of vinegar, to the water greatly 

increases its efficacy. Extremely delicate and susceptible persons 

cannot always bear the excessive perspiration of their hands to be 


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