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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

volume. The ill effects referred to chiefly occur from their being 

used when not required, and in excess, and are aggravated by the 

neglect of thorough cleanliness. 

 

To improve the growth and luxuriance of the hair, when languid or 

defective, the only natural and perfectly safe method that can be 

adopted is to promote the healthy action of the scalp by increasing 

the vigor of the circulation of the blood through its minute channels. 

For this purpose nothing is so simple and effective as gentle 

excitation of the skin by frequent continued friction with the 

hairbrush, which has the convenience of ease of application and 

inexpensiveness. The same object may be further promoted by the 

application of any simple cosmetic wash or other preparation that 

will gently excite or stimulate the skin or exercise a tonic action on 

it without clogging its pores. Strong rosemary water or rosemary tea, 

and a weak solution of the essential oil of either rosemary or garden 

thyme, are popular articles of this kind. They may be rendered more 

stimulating by the addition of a little ammonia or a little spirit, or 

both of them. The skin of the head should be moistened with these on 

each occasion of dressing the hair, and their diffusion and action 

promoted by the use of a clean hairbrush. Aromatized water, to which a 

very little tincture or vinegar of cantharides (preferably the former) 

has been added, may also be used in the same way, and is in high 

repute for the purpose. When the skin is pale, lax, and wrinkled, 

astringent washes may be used. Strong black tea is a convenient and 

excellent application of this kind. When the skin and hair are dry, 

and the latter also stiff and untractable, a little glycerine is an 

appropriate addition to each of the preceding washes or lotions. The 

occasional use of a little bland oil, strongly scented with oil of 

rosemary or of origanum, or with both of them, or with oil of mace, or 

very slightly tinctured with cantharides, is also generally very 

serviceable when there is poorness and dryness of the hair. When the 

hair is unnaturally greasy and lax (a defect that seldom occurs), the 

use of the astringent washes just referred to, or of a little simple 

oil slightly scented with the essential oil of bitter almonds, will 

tend to remove or lessen it. 

 

All the articles named above promote the glossiness and waviness of 

the hair, and are also among the simplest, safest, and best 

applications that can be employed when the hair is weak and begins to 

fall off. 

 

To impart some degree of curliness or waviness to the hair when it is 

naturally straight, and to render it more retentive of the curl 

imparted to it by papers or by other modes of dressing it, various 

methods are often adopted and different cosmetics employed. The first 

object appears to be promoted by keeping the hair for a time in a 


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