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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

state intermediate between perfect dryness and humidity, from which 

different parts of its structure, being unequally affected in this 

respect, will acquire different degrees of relaxation and rigidity, 

and thus have a tendency to assume a wavy or slightly curly form, 

provided the hair be left loose enough to allow it. For this purpose 

nothing is better than washing the hair with soap and water, to which 

a few grains of salt of tartar (carbonate of potash) have been added; 

or it may be slightly moistened with any of the hair washes mentioned 

in the last paragraph, in each half-pint of which a few grains of the 

carbonate (say ten or twelve), or a teaspoonful of glycerine, has 

been dissolved. The moistened hair, after the application of the 

brush, should be finally loosely adjusted as desired with the 

dressing-comb. The effect occurs as the hair dries. When oils are 

preferable to hair washes, those strongly scented with the oil of 

rosemary, to which a few drops of oil of thyme or origanum may be 

added, appear to be the most useful. 

 

To cause the hair to retain the position given to it in dressing it, 

various methods and cosmetics are commonly employed. When the 

arrangement is a natural one and the hair healthy and tractable, the 

free use of the hairbrush will usually be sufficient for the purpose. 

When this is insufficient, the application of a few drops of oil, or, 

better still, moistening the hair with a little simple water, will 

effect the object satisfactorily. In very elaborate and unnatural 

styles of dressing the hair, and to cause it to remain in curl or to 

retain its position during dancing, or violent exercise, bandoline and 

cosmetique or hard pomatum are the articles commonly employed in 

fashionable life. Mild ale or porter has a similar effect, and is 

often substituted for the preceding expensive cosmetics. The frequent 

use of any of these articles is objectionable, as they clog up the 

pores of the skin and shield both it and the hair from the genial 

action of the atmosphere, which is essential to their healthy vigor. 

They should, hence, be subsequently removed by carefully washing the 

head with a little soap and tepid water. Their use may be tolerated in 

dressing for the ballroom, but on no other occasion. Simple water 

skillfully employed, as noticed elsewhere, is the best and safest 

mixture, and under ordinary circumstances is amply sufficient for the 

purpose. 

 

The practice of artificially changing the color of the hair, and 

particularly of dyeing it, has descended to us from remote antiquity, 

and though not so common in Western Europe as formerly, is still far 

from infrequent at the present day. This might be inferred from the 

multitude of nostrums for the purpose continually advertised in the 

newspapers, and from the number of persons who announce themselves as 

practicing the art, even though the keen and experienced eye did not 


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