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Table of contents
THE LADIES' BOOK OF USEFUL INFORMATION. Preface
CONTENTS
PERSONAL BEAUTY-1
PERSONAL BEAUTY-2
PERSONAL BEAUTY-3
PERSONAL BEAUTY-4
PERSONAL BEAUTY-5
PERSONAL BEAUTY-6
PERSONAL BEAUTY-7
TREATING OF MISCELLANEOUS MATTERS-1
MARRIAGE-1
MARRIAGE-2
MARRIAGE-3
LOVE AND MARRIAGE-1
WHEN TO MARRY-HOW TO SELECT A PARTNER ON RIGHT PRINCIPLES
SEXUAL INTERCOURSE-ITS LAWS AND CONDITIONS-ITS USE AND ABUSE
MARRIAGE
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-1
PREGNANCY-LABOR-PARTURITION-2
MENSTRUATION
COLLECTION OF VALUABLE MEDICAL COMPOUNDS
THINGS FOR THE SICK ROOM
THINGS CURIOUS AND USEFUL
HOME DECORATION
FLORAL
HOW TO DO YOUR OWN STAMPING AND MAKE YOUR OWN PATTERNS. BRONZE WORK
CHAPTER 18
INDEX
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES. INTRODUCTION
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-1
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-2
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-3
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-4
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-5
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-6
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-7
HARRIS's LIST OF COVENT-GARDEN LADIES-8

frequently detect instances of it, as it now does, in the hair and 

beards of those we see around us. The recent rage after light auburn 

or reddish hair in fashionable life has, unfortunately, greatly 

multiplied these instances. The consideration of the subject, however, 

in its ethical relations does not come within the province of the 

present work, and I shall confine myself to pointing out how the color 

of the hair may be changed in the safest and most satisfactory 

manner. 

 

To change the color of the hair various methods and preparations are 

employed. The principal of these are intended to darken it, but 

sometimes the contrary is aimed at. Whichever object is desired, it is 

necessary that the article or preparation employed to carry it out be 

not of a caustic or irritant nature, capable of injuriously affecting 

the delicate skin to which it is applied, or that it may be liable to 

come in contact with, as is the case with many of the nostrums vended 

for the purpose. Some of the substances that necessarily enter into 

the composition of hair strains and hair dyes, or that are used in 

connection with them, possess these objectionable properties in a high 

degree, and can, therefore, only be safely employed in a state of 

proper dilution and combination. If any doubt exists respecting such 

an article, it is a wise precaution to regard it with suspicion and to 

test its qualities before applying it for the first time. This may be 

done by placing some of it on the soft skin of the inner side of the 

wrist or fore-arm, and allowing it to remain there as long, and under 

the same conditions, as it is ordered to be left in contact with the 

hair or skin of the head or face. In this way the injury or loss of 

the hair, sores, and other serious consequences that too often follow 

the use of advertised and ill-prepared hair dyes may be generally 

avoided. 

 

To gradually darken the shade of the hair on these principles, 

provided its normal sulphur be still secreted by the hair-bulbs and be 

still present in its structure, it will, therefore, generally be 

sufficient to occasionally employ a weak solution of any of the milder 

salts of iron as a hair wash. The menstruum may be water, to which a 

little spirits and a few drops of oil of rosemary to increase its 

stimulating qualities have been added. In applying it, the head being 

first washed clean, care should be taken to thoroughly moisten the 

whole surface of the hair and the skin of the head with the wash; and 

its absorption and action should be promoted by the free use of a 

clean hairbrush. Wine is the favorite solvent for the iron; ale and 

beer are also sometimes so employed. Most of the fashionable 

ferruginous hair washes also contain a few grains of acetate of copper 

or distilled verdigris, the objections to which have been already 


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